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TÉMA: Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web

Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web 6 éve 5 hónapja #9513

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Reply to #9493
A few weeks ago I planted some fruit trees on my grassland . I put to the roots some special tablets . This tablets contain 2 mycorrhisal fungi and 1 bacteria. (glomus spp. , trichoderma atroviride, the name of the bacteria isn!t signed), the product official name is CLICK COMPRESSED BIOSSTIMULANT.
You wrote before that for the healthy soil we need plenty of bacteria and fungi. So my question is that this product containing just a few integrants could be useful or not?
My other question is, that this root fungi could be useful to the soil in the neighbourhood of the roots?.
Oh, oh. Goodness. I thought all of this product was off the market. Ok.... explanation.

Glomus species are really good mycorrhizal fungi for grasses and ok for deciduous trees. So, good choice there.

But, Trichoderma is a fungus that parasitizes other fungi. See the oh-oh? Trichoderma will parasitize the mycorrhizal fungi as they germinate, grow and try to colonize the roots of the plants.

I had a client once that added mycorrhizal spores to his turf, and palm trees,and got great colonization
75% of the roots colonized. The plants were growing great. But then he bought a "new, improved fungal inoculum", which contained spores of Trichoderma. He made a compost tea,and added this product. All the Trichoderma spores germinated, tracked down all the fungi in the soil, and wiped them all out. In 3 weeks, no mycorrhizal colonization remained on the grasses or the palms. All the plants started showing root problems, fertility issues,diseases. :sick:

When we finally figured out what was going on, we applied extremely fungal compost extracts and recovered the fungi in the soil.. But it took 2 years to get the mycorrhizal colonization, and protection, of the roots back to where it had been before Trichoderma had been added.

Now, if you just added the spores of the Trichoderma, and didn't activate them, then probably don't need to worry. But if the spores were activated and placed in the root systems of the plants, please wait about 1month, and apply an injection of just mycorrhizal spores in a humic acid - compost extract (NO Trichoderma!!!!!) to the roots. We figured out ---- given lots of trials to figure this out - that this worked best.

You have to give the Trichoderma spores the time to finish being active ---- while they wipe out the mycorrhizal fungi --- and go back to sleep. THEN apply new spores of the mycorrhizal fungi and get started on the colonization again.

Because the Trichoderma is now only present in spore form, it won't wake up again,unless you apply some specific foods it needs. So, no simple sugars, no fruit juices, no protein shakes, Keep the Trichoderma asleep, and the VAM can take over again.
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Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web 6 éve 5 hónapja #9527

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Dear Elaine,
could you please suggest a natural (non carcinogenic) microscopy staining agent for bacteria?
Utolsó szerkesztés: 6 éve 5 hónapja Beküldte: kovibali. Indoklás: translation
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Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web 6 éve 5 hónapja #9534

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Hello Elaine,
does it makes sense what this guy is doing?



He buries rice in stocking in to the forest soil.
After a month he collects it and puts it in a bucket with a lot of molasses and water for another month.
Then he is spraying the soil and covering it with plastic.
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Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web 6 éve 5 hónapja #9539

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Elaine,
I also have a "rice experience" and would be interested in your take of the story. In order to grow indiginous microbes we used some cooked rice and added molasses. Put it into the forset for about a week. This is how it looked:



Then we put this mix into a 5 gal bucket and added water. We were areating it for an hour by mixing with a twig. Afterwards we went through the whole farm and sprikled the liquid around on the garden beds and compost heaps. It was not at my place so I couldn't see the results. Do you think this is an effective way to grow native organisms?

I also have another question. If I understood well, you prefer not to mix organic residues into the soil. I have made a couple of "hugelkultur" beds recently, where the point is to add a lot of organic matter (woody and green) into a trench and cover with soil. The OM would slowly decompose, release nutrients and store water. I would be interested if you have ever encountered such beds and what might be your experience. A drawing of such design:

Hugelkultur1.png


I would love to attend a course on the Soil food web. Let's make it happen.
Utolsó szerkesztés: 6 éve 5 hónapja Beküldte: ecovitka.
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Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web 6 éve 5 hónapja #9563

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Please do not use a staining agent to see bacteria.

Instead, watch these organisms are they behave naturally by using the shadowing method with the iris diaphragm on the condensor of a reasonable compound microscope. Please watch the you tube explanation of how to do this.

Staining methods nearly always kill the organisms, and usually requires heat treatment, and drying, during which all sorts of artefacts occur in the bacterial morphology
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Dr. Elaine Ingham - Soil food web 6 éve 5 hónapja #9564

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Reply to #9534
He buries rice in stocking in to the forest soil.
After a month he collects it and puts it in a bucket with a lot of molasses and water for another month.
Then he is spraying the soil and covering it with plastic.

These methods will result in collection of a limited number of species of bacteria, or fungi. Rice is pretty much starch plus a few vitamins, so the species that will colonize and grow to high numbers in the rice will be that limited set of organisms that can use those limited sets of foods that make up rice.

One type of food.......not going to result in a wide diversity of microbes.

Addition to a large amount of molasses will select for an even narrower range of species, Only those bacteria that can use rice, then molasses will grow and increase in numbers.

And since there is a large amount of molasses added, it is quite likely that the few species that can grow will grow extremely rapidly on such a simple, easy-to-use food. They will grow rapidly, and use up oxygen, such that there is a high danger that the liquid will go anaerobic. If that happens, say good-bye to any beneficial microbes managed to survive to this point.

Addition of those organisms to soil, ok......................... but limited set of foods, possibly anaerobic..... and then cover with plastic. what is the likelihood that the organisms being selected are beneficials.

Pathogen organisms.... .those organisms that cause disease..... grow best in reduced oxygen conditions. So, if any of this becomes anaerobic........ it isn't beneficials that will be added.
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